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The Who + Rolling Stones

the-who-50•→http://genius.com/search?q=the+who

Mygeneration

People try to put us d-down   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Just because we get around   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Things they do look awful c-c-cold  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
I hope I die before I get old (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
This is my generation – This is my generation, baby
Why don’t you all f-fade away   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
And don’t try to dig what we all s-s-say   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
I’m not trying to cause a big s-s-sensation  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
I’m just talkin’ ‘bout my g-g-g-generation (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
This is my generation – This is my generation, baby
Why don’t you all f-fade away   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
And don’t try to d-dig what we all s-s-say  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
I’m not trying to cause a b-big s-s-sensation  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
I’m just talkin’ ‘bout my g-g-generation (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
This is my generation – This is my generation, baby
People try to put us d-down   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Just because we g-g-get around  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Things they do look awful c-c-cold  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Yeah, I hope I die before I get old  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
This is my generation – This is my generation, baby
Mygen

I woke up in a Soho doorway – The policeman knew my name
He said, “You can go sleep at home tonight if you can get up and walk away”
I staggered back to the underground – The breeze blew back my hair
I remembered throwing punches around and preachin’ from my chair 
Who are you?   Who who – who who . . . 
I really want to know  –  Someone tell me who are you … 
 
I took the tube back out of town – Back to the rolling pin
I felt a little like a dying clown But with a streak of Rin Tin Tin
I stretched back and I hiccuped – I looked back on my busy day
Eleven hours in the tin pan – God there’s got to be another way 
But who are you?    Who who – who who . . .

We’ll be fighting in the streets with our children at our feet
And the morals that they worship will be gone
And the men who spurred us on sit in judgement of all wrong
They decide and the shotgun sings the song

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again …

The change, it had to come – We knew it all along
We were liberated from the fold, that’s all
And the world looks just the same and history ain’t changed
‘Cause the banners, they are flown in the next war

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution . . .

I’ll move myself and my family aside if we happen to be left half alive
I’ll get all my papers and smile at the sky though I know that the hypnotized never lie
Do ya?

There’s nothing in the streets looks any different to me
And the slogans are replaced, by-the-bye
And the parting on the left are now parting on the right
And the beards have all grown longer overnight

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution . . .

Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

Meet the new boss  same as the old boss

◊→ ‘Baba O’Riley’ ↓ ‘Teenage Wasteland’⇐

teenage_wasteland

the-kids-are-alright   ⇔    kidsarealright

sparks•→ Tommy ←[Live] ⇓ (…lyrics)

K_Russell

    ⇒[London, 1979]⇐
 
⇒[Tampa, 2007]⇐

◊  Paul Crowder’s  Amazing Journey ↓

 The Story of  The Who ⇐(clip_2007)

§  Keith Moon

     Phil Daniels remembers The Who’s drummer Keith Moon, who ODed on 7 September 1978.
With input from friends and colleagues and a rare archive interview.

Keith Moon


whosmissing

¤  John Entwistle  ⇔‘ Thunderfingers’

•→ Pete Townshend & Steve Luongo chat about John Entwistle

This is the director’s cut of Steve Luongo’s interview with Pete Townshend for “An Ox’s Tale” which features an additional 15 minutes from their very candid 3 hour + conversation.

Some of this footage is also featured in “Amazing Journey” 

◊→’ Call Me Lightning’  ↓ [1969]

MagicBus

◊   ‘Behind Blue Eyes’  ⇓   [1971]

No one knows what it’s like  to be the bad man
To be the sad man  – Behind blue eyes
No one knows what it’s like  to be hated
To be fated  to telling only lies
But my dreams  – They aren’t as empty  as my conscience seems to be 
I have hours, only lonely  –  My love is vengeance that’s never free

No one knows what it’s like  to feel these feelings
Like I do  – And I blame you
No one bites back as hard  on their anger
None of my pain and woe  can show through
But my dreams  . . .

When my fist clenches, crack it open – Before I use it and lose my cool
When I smile, tell me some bad news – Before I laugh and act like a fool
If I swallow anything evil – Put your finger down my throat
If I shiver, please give me a blanket – Keep me warm, let me wear your coat

No one knows what it’s like  to be the bad man – To be the sad man  – Behind blue eyes.

•→‘Naked Eye’     ⇓     ‘My Wife’  ←•

      ◊→  5.15  ↓ (1973)

5.15 – Why should I care?  Why should I care . . .

♦→ ‘Squeeze Box’  ⇓  [1975]

Mama’s got a squeeze box she wears on her chest
And when Daddy comes home he never gets no rest

‘Cause she’s playing all night and the music’s all right
Mama’s got a squeeze box – Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don’t eat and the dog can’t sleep
There’s no escape from the music in the whole damn street

‘Cause she’s playing all night . . .
She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out
… Mama’s got a squeeze box – Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes, squeeze me, come on and squeeze me
Come on and tease me like you do – I’m so in love with you
Mama’s got a squeeze box – Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out
‘Cause she’s playing all night . . .
O_cuffs

•  London 2012  The Who / Olympics Finale 

‘Great’ Britain,  midgeted by Brazil at the Olympic Games until The Who turned up. . .

[. . . “Baba O’Riley”]

Out here in the fields  –  I fight for my meals  –  I get my back into my living
I don’t need to fight  –  To prove I’m right  –  I don’t need to be forgiven
Don’t cry  –  Don’t raise your eye  –  It’s only teenage wasteland

Sally take my hand  –  Travel south crossland – Put out the fire  –  Don’t look past my shoulder
The exodus is here  –  The happy ones are near – Let’s get together  –  Before we get much older

[. . . “We’re Not Gonna Take It”]

See me,  feel me – Touch me, heal me  . . .the-who
Listening to you, I get the music
Gazing at you, I get the heat
Following you, I climb the mountain
I get excitement at your feet
Right behind you, I see the millions  
On you, I see the glory
From you, I get opinions  
From you, I get the story . . .

[. . . “My generation”]

People try to put us d-down  (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)
Just because we get around   (Talkin’ ‘bout my generation)

I’m not trying to cause a big s-s-sensation
I’m just talkin’ ‘bout my g-g-g-generation

This is my generation  –  This is my generation, baby . . .

♦  SuperBowl XLIV Half-Time Show  ↓  2010

↓   Medley  .  .  .

•  “Pinball Wizard”

Ever since I was a young boy, I’ve played the silver ball.
From Soho down to Brighton, I must have played them all.
But I ain’t seen nothing like him  in any amusement hall…
That deaf dumb and blind kid  sure plays a mean pinball ! 
 Sure plays a mean pin ball !
 
He’s a pinball wizard – There has got to be a twist.
A pinball wizard,  S’got such a supple wrist.
‘How do you think he does it?’ ‘I don’t know!’
‘What makes him so good?’

•  “Baba O’Riley”

Out here in the fields, I fight for my meals – I get my back into my living
I don’t need to fight to prove I’m right – I don’t need to be forgiven
Don’t cry  –  Don’t raise your eye  –  It’s only teenage wasteland

Sally take my hand  –  Travel south cross land
Put out the fire and don’t look past my shoulder
The exodus is here  –  The happy ones are near
Let’s get together  Before we get much older

Teenage wasteland – oh yeah, it’s only teenage wasteland . . . We’re all wasted

•  “Who Are You”

I woke up in a Soho doorway – The policeman knew my name
He said, “You can go sleep at home tonight if you can get up and walk away”
I staggered back to the underground – The breeze blew back my hair
I remembered throwing punches around and I was preachin’ from my chair 
But who are you?    Who who … who who
Come on and tell me who are you?    Who who … who who 
I really wanna know  –  Who who … who who …

•  “See Me, Feel Me”    –   See me, feel me, touch me, heal me . . .

•  “We won’t get fooled again”

We’ll be fighting in the streets  with our children at our feet
And the morals that they worship will be gone
And the men who spurred us on, they  sit in judgement of all wrong
They decide and the shotgun sings the song

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution – Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play  just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray – We don’t get fooled again …

I’ll move myself and my family aside – If we happen to be left half alive
I’ll get all my papers and smile at the sky though I know that the hypnotized never lie
Do ya?
There’s nothing in the streets  Looks any different to me
And the slogans are replaced, by-the-bye
And the parting on the left  are now parting on the right
And the beards have all grown longer overnight
I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution – Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play  just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray – We don’t get fooled again
Don’t get fooled again  –  No, no!
Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!
Meet the new boss – Same as the old boss
♦  Endless Wire Tour  ⇓  [Glastonbury_2007]
who_logo
  1. I Can’t Explain 
  2. The Seeker 
  3. Anyway Anyhow Anywhere 
  4. Fragments 
  5. Who Are You 
  6. Behind Blue Eyes
  7. Baba O’Riley 
  8. Relay  
  9. You Better You Bet  
  10. My Generation thewho-quadrophenia
  11. Won’t Get Fooled Again 
  12. The Kids Are Alright
  13. Pinball Wizard 
  14. Amazing Journey 
  15. Sparks 
  16. See Me, Feel Me 
  17. Tea & Theatre 

• end scene from the movie [1979]⇒

Quad

←Quadrophenia – Can You See the Real Me?

[doc_2012]  ↓

In his home studio and revisiting old haunts in Shepherds Bush and Battersea, Pete Townshend opens his heart and his personal archive to revisit ‘the last great album the Who ever made’, one that took the Who full circle back to their earliest days via the adventures of a pill-popping mod on an epic journey of self-discovery.

But in 1973 Quadrophenia was an album that almost never was. Beset by money problems, a studio in construction, heroin-taking managers, a lunatic drummer and a culture of heavy drinking, Townshend took on an album that nearly broke him and one that within a year the band had turned their back on and would ignore for nearly three decades.

With unseen archive and in-depth interviews from Townshend, Roger Daltrey, Keith Moon, John Entwistle and those in the studio and behind the lens who made the album and thirty page photo booklet. Contributors include: Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, Ethan Russell, Ron Nevison, Richard Barnes, Irish Jack Lyons, Bill Curbishley, John Woolf, Howie Edelson, Mark Kermode and Georgiana Steele Waller.


EminenceFront

PeteT

•   •   •    EMPTY GLASS  (1980)  +  WHITE CITY  (1985)

1 •→Face to Face              2 •→Rough Boys             3 •→Give Blood   ↑

pt_truancy

•  ‘Guantanamo’  ⇑  [2015]

Down in Guantanamo  we still got the ball and chain
Down in Guantanamo  we still got the ball and chain
The pretty piece of Cuba rezoned to cause men pain
When you light up in Cuba you won’t feel the same again

Down in Guantanamo – Still waiting for the big cigars
Down in Guantanamo – Still waiting for the big cigars
Been a breach of promise – Still guilty with no charge
There’s smoke in the forest and the humor is cooking large

Down in Guantanamo  we still got the ball and chain
Down in Guantanamo  we still got the ball and chain
There’s a long road to travel for justice to make its claim
Let’s bring down the gavel – Let the prisoner say his name

We still got the ball and chain . . . We still got the ball and chain
Let the prisoner say his name

townshend

*********************************************

Pete Townshend interviewed by Alexis Petridis [The Guardian, 9 October 2012]

¤  Pete Townshend  ↓  ‘Who I Am’  

•→ CHAPTER 1  –  I WAS THERE (read excerpt)

who-i-am

¤  Listen to Pete Townshend read from his autobiography  ‘Who I Am’ →

•  CHAPTER 12
–   TOMMY: THE MYTHS, THE MUSIC, THE MUD

The Who were to play on day two of the festival, the last show on Saturday night, following Sly and the Family Stone and Janis Joplin. Someone suggested that, because of problems on the local roads, we should leave early for our set. Karen and I made a quick decision that the baby needed peace and quiet, so I would go to the festival site alone. I slipped into my Doc Martens and my white boiler-suit, and we climbed into a limo. Our drivers said the helicopters had stopped flying when the charter company realised they weren’t going to get paid. Wiggy’s ears pricked up. He was responsible for collecting our fee.

It took ninety minutes to drive two miles along a road so muddy that occasionally we needed to be pushed by passers-by. The road was littered with abandoned motorcycles and cars, some still containing tents and other belongings. It looked like a wartime flight. John and Keith were behaving strangely in the car. We’d only been in the hotel for fifteen minutes and they’d managed to score dope.

The scene greetings us at the backstage area of the festival was horrific. The entire parking area was a slurry of thick, gelatinous mud. The backstage crew were covered in it, and their travels back and forth to the stage were traipsing mud everywhere. As I got out of the car I slipped and sank up to my knees.

There were no dressing rooms available so we went to a tent with a hot-water machine, tea-bags, instant coffee and a coffee dispenser. I helped myself, and within minutes realised the water had been spiked with acid. It was fairly dilute, but as the low-level trip kicked in about twenty minutes later I noticed a photo of Meher Baba posted high on a telegraph pole. It was a wonderful moment. The image was ubiquitous at the time. Meher Baba as a young man, handsome, long-haired, Christ-like. It felt like a sign to me that everything would be OK.

Then tragedy struck. As I gazed at the photo a young man, barefoot and shirtless, clearly out of his head, leapt up on the roof of an ambulance parked under a telegraph pole and gracefully shinned up some thirty feet. As he touched the photo he screamed and fell backwards, landing on top of the ambulance. The telegraph pole was in fact a power line. Then paramedics ran out to attend to the unconscious man. When I went into the first-aid tent to investigate I thought I had walked into the set of M*A*S*H. There were cots of patients everywhere, mainly young people on bad trips, but some injured, mostly kids suffering from bouts of terror.

Back outside the tent I saw the faces of John and Keith peeping out from the back window of a station wagon. They waved and grinned; later I learned that each of them had a girl’s mouth around their cocks.

I walked alone on the edge of the main field where most of the audience gathered. Rumour had it that over a million people had come to Woodstock, and it looked like half that number were scattered on the hill. The light was fading fast as I entered an eerie woodland scene: naked fairies dancing between the trees, dealers carrying trays of readymade joints, tabs of acid, hash, grass and rolling papers.

As I broke through the woods I came across the open area where most of the campers were strewn about. Thousands sat listening to the music pulsating up the hill from the stage, as though in a natural amphitheatre. The sound system wasn’t bad, but neither was it designed to cover such a massive area. Occasionally someone would try to engage me, sometimes a loved-up soul on trip, smiling and kind, sometimes another over-stocked boy like the one on the pole, demanding money or drugs, threatening violence, then laughing and running away at lightning speed like a woodland sprite.

The highlight that night had been Sly and the Family Stone, who had whipped the crowd into a muddy lather with ‘I Want to Take You Higher’. Instead of acid they must have been doing cocaine: the music was urgent, dark and powerful. By now, in the early morning hours, Janis Joplin was finishing her encore, ‘Ball and Chain’, which would cap the last set before ours. She has been amazing at Monterey, but tonight she wasn’t at her best, probably due to the long delay, and probably, too, to the amount of booze and heroin she’d consumed while she waited. But even Janis on an off-night was incredible.

woodstock69

As our turn on stage approached, I worried about losing the effect of the stage lights. I asked someone what time the sun was gonna rise. As we set up our gear and began to play, some of the people in sleeping bags started rubbing their eyes and sitting up. As usual, I was pounding around like a frothing pony, fighting to keep my Gibson SG in tune, constantly fiddling with my amplifiers.

Whoever was doing the lights had chosen white lamps for Roger, so his long, curly hair looked like golden fire. He was mostly singing with his eyes firmly closed. Suddenly someone appeared at Roger’s feet holding a big film camera. Roger nearly tripped over him, so I pushed the invader back down into the press-pit in front of the stage. It turned out to be Michael Wadleigh, filming the documentary that would make Woodstock legendary.

Vulnerable now, Roger moved in ways that seemed to mean something deeper. His whirling microphone and mythical poses suggested frustration and pain, his sweat an angelic sheen that evoked an Old Master painting. By contrast, John and Keith were laid back. They’d dropped acid and consorted with a couple of friendly fans, and it showed. Skilled musicians that they were, however, they were still able to follow my lead.

As we started to play ‘Acid Queen’ I put myself in character, imagining myself as the black-hearted gypsy who had promised to bring Tommy out of his autistic condition but was actually a sexual monster, using drugs to break him. As I walked to the mike stand, someone stepped in front of me, trying to stop the music. It was Abbie Hoffman. ‘This is a crock of shit,’ he shouted into the mike, waving his arms at the audience. ‘My friend [the Detroit poet] John Sinclair is in jail for one lousy joint and …’ He got no further.

Still playing the ‘Acid Queen’ intro, and still feeling malevolent, I knocked Abbie aside using the headstock of my guitar. A sharp end of one of my strings must have pierced his skin because he reacted as though stung, retreating to sit cross-legged at the side of the stage. He glowered at me, his neck bleeding.

L_t_y

I finished the song and looked over at him. “Sorry about that,” I mouthed.

‘Fuck you,’ he mouthed back, and left the stage.

I was always absurdly territorial about our performance space. This may have been instilled in me as a little boy with my father’s band, the Squadronaires: the stage was sacrosanct.

By the time we hit ‘I’m Free’ most of the audience was on its feet. Before I knew it, Roger was singing ‘See me, feel me, touch me, heal me’ to waves of young people who suddenly realised that Tommy was music unwittingly designed for precisely this kind of festival, for this particular moment, for them. At one point Keith shouted, ‘For Christ’s sake, Pete. No more!’ I went into a long, feedback-rich guitar solo as the sky behind the hillside began to pale with the first signs of dawn. Ebullient but weary, I struck my guitar on the floor a few times, tossed it into the audience and The Who went back to London.

◊  Pete Townshend  ↓  Lifehouse Chronicles – Disc 3

0:00 – Baba M1 (O’Riley 2nd Movement 1971)
3:04 – Who Are You (Gateway Remix — From Shepherds Bush Empire 1998)

12:09 – Behind Blue Eyes (New version 1999)
16:06 – Baba M2 (2nd Movement Part 1 1971)

19:24 – Pure and Easy (Original Demo Reworked 1999)
28:40 – Vivaldi (Baba M5 on Psychoderelict) with Hame 1999)

31:22 – Who Are You (Live and Uncut at the Shepherds Bush Empire 1998)
44:09 – Hinterland Rag (Piano Rag for Three Hands — Yamaha Disklavier 1999)

46:58 – Pure and Easy (New Version 1999)
51:45 – Can You Help the One You Really Love? (Demo 1999)

56:49 – Won’t Get Fooled Again (Live and Uncut at the Shepherd’s Bush Empire 1998)

•  Pure and Easy  [lyrics]

There once was a note, pure and easy,
Playing so free, like a breath rippling by.
The note is eternal, I hear it, it sees me,
Forever we blend it, forever we die.
 
I listened and I heard music in a word,
And words when you played your guitar,
The noise that I was hearing was a million people cheering,
And a child flew past me riding in a star.
 
As people assemble,
Civilization is trying to find a new way to die,
But killing is really merely scene changer,
All men are bored with other men’s lies.
 
I listened and I heard music in a word …
 
Gas on the hillside, oil in the teacup,
Watch all the chords of life lose their joy,
Distortion becomes somehow pure in its wildness,
The note that began all can also destroy.
 
We all know success when we all find our own dreams,
And our love is enough to knock down any walls,
And the future’s been seen as men try to realize,
The simple secret of the note in us all.
 
I listened and I heard music in a word …
 
There once was a note, pure and easy,
Playing so free, like a breath rippling by. 
There once was a note, listen  .  .  .
♦     ◊     ♦
♦→  The Rolling Stones “Charlie is my Darling”  ⇓  Ireland 1965

logoRSWhat was once rumor is now fact as ABKCO Films presents a brand new cut, meticulously restored and fully-realized version of this first-ever, legendary but never released film. Shot by Peter Whitehead on a quick tour of Ireland just weeks after “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” hit # 1 on the charts and became the international anthem for a generation, The Rolling Stones Charlie is my Darling – Ireland 1965 is an intimate, behind-the-scenes diary of life on the road with the young Stones. It features the first professionally filmed concert performances of the band and documents the early frenzy of their fans and the riots the band’s appearances inspired.

This new 2012 version of the film with added never-before-seen footage was re-envisioned and restored by director Mick Gochanour and producer Robin Klein, the Grammy Award winning team that brought the classic The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus to the screen. Charlie is my Darling’s dramatic and stunning concert footage — including electrifying performances of “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” “The Last Time” and “Time Is On My Side” — shows the band developing its  musical style by blending blues, R&B and rock-n-roll riffs. Off-the-cuff interviews are juxtaposed with revealing, comical scenes of the band goofing on one another as well as unsuspecting outsiders, and offers an unmatched look inside the day-to-day life of the Stones.

◊→ ‘Sweet Black Angel’  ↓ [“Exile On Main Street”_1972]

sympathyforthed

Φ  ‘Let It Bleed’   ↓  (1969)

Well, we all need someone we can lean on  and if you want it, you can lean on me …
 
She said, “My breasts, they will always be open. Baby, you can rest your weary head right on me
And there will always be a space in my parking lot  when you need a little coke and sympathy”
 
Yeah, we all need someone we can dream on  and if you want it, baby, well you can dream on me
Yeah, we all need someone we can cream on  and if you want to, well you can cream on me
 
I was dreaming of a steel guitar engagement  when you drunk my health in scented jasmine tea
But you knifed me in my dirty filthy basement  with that jaded, faded, junky nurse  
Oh what pleasant company
 
We all need someone we can feed on  and if you want it, well you can feed on me
Take my arm, take my leg, oh baby don’t you take my head
Yeah, we all need someone we can bleed on 
Yeah, and if you want it, baby, well you can bleed on me
Yeah, we all need someone we can bleed on
Yeah, yeah, and if you want it, baby, why don’cha bleed on me
All over
Ahh, bleed it alright, bleed it alright, bleed it alright – You can bleed all over me
Bleed it alright, bleed it alright, you can be my rider – You can cum all over me
Bleed it alright, baby, bleed it alright, bleed it alright – You can cum all over me
Bleed it alright, baby cum all over me
φ  ‘Sister Morphine’  ↓  (1997)

Here I lie in my hospital bed
Tell me, Sister Morphine, when are you coming round again?
Oh, I don’t think I can wait that long
Oh you see that I’m not that strong
The scream of the ambulance is sounding in my ears
Tell me, Sister Morphine, how long have I been lying here?
What am I doing in this place?
Why does the doctor have no face?
Oh, I can’t crawl across the floor Ah,
Can’t you see, Sister Morphine, I’m trying to score …
 
Sweet cousin cocaine, lay your cool cool hands on my head
Ah come on, Sister Morphine, you better make up my bed
‘Cause you know and I know in the morning I’ll be dead
You can sit around and you can watch all the clean white sheets stained red.
Θ  ‘Harlem Shuffle’  (1986)  ↓  feat. Carmen Electra

You move it to the left – And you go for yourself  –  You move it to the right – Yeah if it takes all night
Now take it kinda slow – With a whole lot of soul  –  Don’t move it too fast – Just make it last

You scratch just like a monkey – Yeah you do real cool
You slide it to the limbo  –  Yeah how low can you go?
Now come on baby – Don’t fall down on me now  –  Just move it right here  to the Harlem shuffle
Yeah yeah yeah to the Harlem shuffle  –  Yeah yeah yeah to the Harlem shuffle

Hitch hitch hike baby   Across the floor  –  I can’t stand it no more
Now come on baby  –  Now get into your slide  –  Just ride ride ride  –  Little pony, ride!

Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle  –  Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle
Do the Monkey shine
Yeah yeah yeah shake a tail feather baby – Yeah yeah yeah shake a tail feather baby
Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle  –  Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle
Yeah like your mother told you how
Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle  –  Yeah yeah yeah do the Harlem shuffle

♦  ‘Wild Horses’   ↓  [“Stripped”]

 
Childhood living is easy to do – The things you wanted I bought them for you
Graceless lady you know who I am – You know I can’t let you slide through my hands
Wild horses couldn’t drag me away  . . .
 
I watched you suffer a dull aching pain – Now you decided to show me the same
No sweeping exits or offstage lines could make me feel bitter or treat you unkind
Wild horses couldn’t drag me away  . . .
 
I know I dreamed you a sin and a lie – I have my freedom but I don’t have much time
Faith has been broken, tears must be cried – Let’s do some living after we die
Wild horses couldn’t drag me away – Wild, wild horses, we’ll ride them some day . . .
hearmeknocking

¤   The History of  the Rolling Stones  ⇓

•  FormationRS

British rock band The Rolling Stones formed in 1962 in London, England. The initial line-up consisted of vocalist Mick Jagger, guitarist Keith Richards, guitarist Brian Jones, bassist Dick Taylor, drummer Tony Chapman and pianist Ian Stewart, with Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts forming the rhythm section.

•  First Singles and Album

In 1962, the group played an eight-month residency at a London club, which caught the attention of their first label. This led to the release of their first singles, “Come On,” and “I Wanna Be Your Man.” These charting singles allowed The Rolling Stones to book shows outside of London and eventually resulted in their 1964 self-titled debut. The Rolling Stones album featured mostly R&B cover tunes, and one Jagger- and Richards-penned track, “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back).”

•  Second and Third Albums

Their sophomore effort, 12 x 5, also came out in 1964 and contained their first UK hit, “It’s All Over Now.” This was followed by a commercially successful album entitled, The Rolling Stones No. 2 in 1965.

 Satisfaction

Their next record, Out of Our Heads, included many more original compositions than their previous work. Its most popular single, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” was the band’s first international hit. 1966’s Aftermath was The Rolling Stones’ first album to feature songs written only by Jagger and Richards. Notable tracks were “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?” and “Paint It, Black.”

•  Alleged Drug Use and More Albums

In 1967, the band released Between the Buttons, which spawned the tunes, “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Ruby Tuesday.” That same year, a tabloid newspaper targeted the Rolling Stones in an article that sparked the interest of the authorities to their alleged drug use. Jagger, Richards and Jones were later charged with drug offenses. This was followed by the more psychedelic album, Their Satanic Majesties Request, which included the single, “In Another Land.”

 “Beggars Banquet” and a Circus

1968 saw the release of the single, “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and the album, Beggars Banquet. This more bluesy record produced the single, “Sympathy for the Devil.” Two circus-themed concerts starring John Lennon, The Who and the Rolling Stones themselves were also filmed that year, and would later be released as the movie, “The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus.”

•  Brian Jones’ Death

The next year, Brian Jones left the band due to his drug problems, and was replaced by Mick Taylor. Less than a month later, on July 3rd, 1969 Jones was found drowned in his swimming pool. Just two days later, the Stones performed at London’s Hyde Park, and debuted the single, “Honky Tonk Women.”

•  Gimme Shelter

That December, the album Let It Bleed, featuring the song, “Gimme Shelter,” was released. The group also played the infamous Altamont Free Concert, footage of which appeared in the 1970 documentary, “Gimme Shelter.” The live album, Get Yer Ya-Yas Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert, also came out that year.

•  Rolling Stones Records

1971’s Sticky Fingers was their first record on their own label, Rolling Stones Records. It marked Taylor’s first release with the band and generated the hits, “Wild Horses” and “Brown Sugar.” The next year, the record, Exile on Main Street, hit number one on the charts. It was followed by Goats Head Soup, a less successful effort that still had a hit with the song, “Angie.”

•  Ronnie Wood

Despite the success of the 1974 album, It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll, Mick Taylor quit the Rolling Stones. The first album featuring his replacement, Ronnie Wood, was 1976’s Black and Blue. While trying to finish their next live album, 1977’s Love You Live, Keith Richards faced drug charges that delayed the recording sessions.

 “Miss You” and Mounting Tensions

In the late 70s, the Stones began to experience poor sales and reviews. The faster-paced rock and roll of their 1978 album, Some Girls, reignited their popularity, especially with the help of the single, “Miss You.” However, mounting tensions between Jagger and Richards affected the recording of their next effort, 1980’s Emotional Rescue.

•  Touring

The huge American tour that followed the release of the 1981 album, Tattoo You, was later documented in the 1983 film, “Let’s Spend the Night Together.” Their European tour of the following year saw the addition of another member to the Stones’ line-up, piano player Chuck Leavell.

 Solo Work, Another Death, Another Replacement

After the release of the 1983 album, Undercover, solo projects increased tensions between Jagger and Richards. As a result, 1986’s Dirty Work contained many more Richards-penned tracks than usual. Nevertheless, the pair reconciled after the death of Ian Stewart and the Stones released Steel Wheels in 1989. Bill Wyman retired shortly thereafter.

•  More Music and More Shows

The Grammy-winning Voodoo Lounge would be Darryl Jones’ first album as Wyman’s replacement. This was followed by the 1997 album, Bridges to Babylon, which received mixed reviews. A Bigger Bang was released in 2005, with shows from the ensuing tour recorded and eventually seen in the 2008 film, “Shine a Light.”

•  Legacy

Their unique sound and lively shows have made the Rolling Stones one of the biggest rock bands of all time. They have been going strong since the 1960s and their music will surely continue to do so for a very long time.

♦  Life_Keith Richards  autobiography  ⇓

life_richards
“This is me, Keith Richards, and what you’ve got is the audio version of “LIFE“, my autobiography. Thanks a lot for listening; I’m grateful to my friend Johnny Depp for doing this. Summer I slept for many years on average twice a week, and this means that I’ve been conscious for at least three lifetimes. Well, that is so but believe it or not I remember everything. So get ready for the ride… It starts with the band; it starts at a moment when I was in deep trouble [. . . ?] when everything, Rolling Stones and all, looks as if it was gonna come to a sticky end on a country road in Arkansas. I used all my nine lives long ago, but here I am, I’m still playing and I’m still rocking and still rolling, and I survived to tell you this tale and I hope you’ll enjoy it.”
∇  Listen to excerpts from chapters … 3 & 5  →KR_life

Brian, after figuring out how much it would cost, called up Jazz News, which was a kind of “who’s playing where” rag, and said, “We’ve got a gig at…” “What do you call yourselves?” We stared at one another. “It?” Then “Thing?” This call is costing. Muddy Waters to the rescue! First track on The Best of Muddy Waters is “Rollin’ Stone.” The cover is on the floor. Desperate, Brian, Mick and I take the dive. “The Rolling Stones.” Phew!! That saved sixpence.

Alexis Korner’s band was booked to do a BBC live broadcast on July 12, 1962, and he’d asked us if we’d fill in for him at the Marquee.  The core Stones, Mick, Brian and I, played our set list: “Dust My Broom,” “Baby What’s Wrong?” “Doing the Crawdaddy,” “Confessin’ the Blues,” “Got My Mojo Working.” You’re sitting with some guys, and you’re playing and you go, “Ooh, yeah!” That feeling is worth more than anything. There’s a certain moment when you realize that you’ve actually just left the planet for a bit and that nobody can touch you. Don’t matter. They can´t even bust you. Not that you’re thinking of getting busted. But you’re elevated because you’re with a bunch of guys that want to do the same thing as you. And when it works, baby, you’ve got wings…

*      *      *

… But effects are not my thing. I just go for quality of sound. Do I want this sharp and hard and cutting, or do I want warm, smooth “Beast of Burden” stuff? Basically you go: Fender or Gibson?

In “Satisfaction” I was imagining horns, trying to imitate their sound to put on the track later when we recorded. I’d already heard the riff in my head the way Otis Redding did it later, thinking, this is gonna be the horn line. But we didn’t have any horns, and I was only going to lay down a dub. The fuzz tone came in handy so I could give a shape to what the horns were supposed to do. But the fuzz tone had never been heard before anywhere, and that’s the sound that caught everybody’s imagination. Next thing I know, we’re listening to ourselves in Minnesota somewhere on the radio, “Hit of the Week,” and we didn’t even know Andrew had put the thing out! At first I was mortified. As far as I was concerned that was just the dub. Ten days on the road and it’s number one nationally! The record of the summer of ’65. So I’m not arguing. And I learned that lesson –sometimes you can overwork things.

Read more excerpts . . . →[01]←  / →[02]←  /  →[03]←  /  →[04]←

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