octubre 2019
L M X J V S D
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Spondulicks

¤  Pictionaries . . . ⇒[01]⇐  /  ⇒[02]⇐

•  Money Idioms . . . ⇒[01] ⇔ [02] ⇔ [03]⇐
  • Be closed-fisted :  To be very stingy.
  • Be pressed for money :  To be very rich.
  • Be rolling in money :  When you have a lot of money.
  • Live on a shoe string :  To have a difficult life and have no money but not to show it to others.
  • Easy come, easy go :  When you earn money or something easily, you will miss it easily, too.
  • Pay a heavy price for some thing :   To defray a lot of money.
  • Live beyond ones means :   To spend money more than you have.
  • Hit the jack pot :   To earn a lot of money.
  • Money for old rope :   Convenient money.
  • Make a fast / quick back :  To earn money easily.
  • He is asking an arm and leg for it :   To ask money which is not your right.
  • I paid cash on the nail :   To pay money for sth with difficulty.
  • Not have a bean =  I am broke :  I don’t have any money.
  • A well-headed person :   To be super rich.
increase
∇  Phrasal verbs  ⇓

∞  «rip off»   ⇓  «bargain»

Shopping & Buying  ⇓  [by Ceema]

•→10 Business Negotiations Idioms Explained ⇐

¤  Banking & money vocabulary  . . .  ⇒[01] ⇔ [02] ⇔ [03] ⇔ [04] ⇐

→QUIZ # 1←    /    •→QUIZ # 2←    /   •→QUIZ # 3← 

→pdf ⇐Matching exercise  /  →pdf ⇐Gap-fill exercise  /  →pdf ⇐Discussion questions

• The hard-up … [badly-off]

If you lack the wherewithal or you ‘can’t make ends meet’, you may be ‘strapped for cash’ or, even worse, ‘penniless’: ‘broke’, ‘skint’, ‘busted’ … are slang synonyms; they all mean ‘bankrupt’, ‘poverty-stricken’.

• The well-off …

Wealthy people with loads of dough (or bread) are often called «moneybags». They ‘live on Easy Street’. A jocular way of referring to them:  «filthy rich».

money

∞   Two opposite FALSE FRIENDS: they don’t mean what you think!

– EXTRAVAGANT = ‘spendthrift’,  ‘squanderer’,  ‘profligate’,  ‘prodigal’ 

– PARSIMONIOUS = ‘mingy’,  ‘stingy’  (adj),  ‘scrooge’,  ‘skinflint’  (n.)

¶    In times of economic stress . . .

… we go short  (= do without things);F_crisis

… we tighten our belts  (=go hungry)

… we cut down on luxuries  (=spend less on unessential things)

… we make do  (=manage with whatever we can get)

prices

♦  Four Idioms ↓  to Say Something Is Expensive

Hello I’m English Teacher Fred how are you today? Today I’ve got some idioms about money. It’s four idioms that mean basically the same thing. They all mean something is very expensive. People talk about money a lot, so there’s many, many many words about things being expensive or cheap. Now, all four of these mean something is very expensive.

The first one: we paid a pretty penny for that! It was really expensive. It cost a pretty penny. A penny is a small amount of money, it’s the smallest amount of money, the smallest coin. But a pretty penny means very expensive. We paid a pretty penny for that, it was really expensive.

Okay, here’s another one. This one is pay through the nose. We paid through the nose for that car, it was so expensive! We had to pay through the nose. Pay through the nose? I don’t know why people would say that, I don’t know where it comes from. But it’s just something very common that people say. We had to pay through the nose for dinner last night, it was so expensive. We paid through the nose.

Here’s another one from the body: pay an arm and a leg. An arm and a leg. We paid an arm and a leg for that, it was so expensive. Very expensive. Paid an arm and a leg. Paid an arm and a leg. Listen to my American pronunciation: an arm and a leg. When people say idioms they usually say them very fast, because we know what the whole phrase is so we don’t need to say it slowly and clearly. «We-paid-an-arm-and-a-leg-for-that», would be very strange, it sounds unusual. We paid and arm and a leg for that, is normal. An arm and a leg, an arm and a leg. It’s American pronunciation: an arm and a leg. If we say all the words separately: «an /arm /and/ a/ leg»– it sounds very strange. An arm and a leg, sounds too formal. So we say it quickly: an_arm_and_a_leg. We paid an arm and a leg for that. An arm and a leg. An arm and a leg. It’s a little bit difficult: an arm and a leg. An arm and a… Anarmana. «We paid an arm and a leg for that, it was so expensive.»

Okay and one more: top dollar. We paid top dollar, it was really expensive. We had to pay top dollar. It means the most expensive, the highest price: top dollar. We paid top dollar for that it was really expensive. So it better be good, right?

Okay, that’s four idioms, all meaning the same thing: very expensive.

Come by English teacher Fred.com for more videos, more stuff. Okay, have a nice day. Bye-bye.

◊  How the Stock Market Works ↓ for Dummies

•→vocabulary/economic-recession

Deja un comentario

Puede utilizar estas etiquetas HTML

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  

  

  

Este sitio usa Akismet para reducir el spam. Aprende cómo se procesan los datos de tus comentarios.